The One-Hand Cut. Known as a “Charlier” cut, this is when a magician uses a single hand to separate the deck into two portions, flipping the upper half and lower half to switch their positions. It adds a cool flourish to easy card tricks, and it’s a necessary move to progress to a more advanced card trick. Plus, it leaves an empty hand free to perform misdirection or additional sleights.

Smash a cup through a table “accidentally.” Explain to your audience that you're going to pass a magical ball through a solid tabletop using a small cup and a “cloak of concealment” (an ordinary piece of paper). Place the cup upside down over the ball, then mold the paper around the cup so that it covers it completely. Pick up the paper-covered cup to give your audience one last look at the ball. As you do, drop the cup into your lap inconspicuously and cradle it between your thighs. Put the cup-shaped paper shell back over the ball and give it a smack. Remove the cloak to show that the ball is still there, but the cup has rematerialized beneath the table.[8]
This is probably the simplest trick in the list. All you have to do is fill the bag ¾ way and drive the pencil into the bag. You will notice that the water won’t spill and the explanation is scientific. Plastic bags like Ziploc bags are polymers which have long bonds and chains. When the pencil enters the polymer, its molecules form a shield around the pencil trapping the water molecules. But this is your secret. No one in the audience has to know about it.
2. Make the secret a lot more trouble than the trick seems worth. You will be fooled by a trick if it involves more time, money, and practice than you (or any other sane onlooker) would be willing to invest. My partner, Penn, and I once produced 500 live cockroaches from a top hat on the desk of talk show host David Letterman. To prepare this took weeks. We hired an entomologist who provided slow-moving, camera-friendly cockroaches (the kind from under your stove don’t hang around for close-ups) and taught us to pick the bugs up without screaming like preadolescent girls. Then we built a secret compartment and worked out a devious routine for sneaking the compartment into the hat. More trouble than the trick was worth? To you, probably. But not to magicians.

This is probably the simplest trick in the list. All you have to do is fill the bag ¾ way and drive the pencil into the bag. You will notice that the water won’t spill and the explanation is scientific. Plastic bags like Ziploc bags are polymers which have long bonds and chains. When the pencil enters the polymer, its molecules form a shield around the pencil trapping the water molecules. But this is your secret. No one in the audience has to know about it.


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A magician needs specially cut screens to move a hand through mirror or glass. The back screen covers 2 mirror panels. When the performance begins, the whole construction shifts the real mirror to the back side, moving 2 fake mirror panels forward. Now there is a space to move a hand. At the end of the performance, the assistants shift the real mirror to the front side again.

In the past five years, magic—normally deemed fit only for children and tourists in Las Vegas—has become shockingly respectable in the scientific world. Even I—not exactly renowned as a public speaker—have been invited to address conferences on neuroscience and perception. I asked a scientist friend (whose identity I must protect), “Why the sudden interest?” He replied that those who fund science research find magicians “sexier than lab rats.”


A glass of water is placed on the table which is covered with a handkerchief. Then, the magician lifts it up and throws it into the air. The result: the handkerchief falls on the floor, and the glass disappears. The trick here is two-fold: firstly, there’s a wire ring sewn into the handkerchief, which creates the illusion that the glass is underneath the handkerchief. Secondly, the glass is then lowered into a secret pouch through a hole in the table.
2. Make the secret a lot more trouble than the trick seems worth. You will be fooled by a trick if it involves more time, money, and practice than you (or any other sane onlooker) would be willing to invest. My partner, Penn, and I once produced 500 live cockroaches from a top hat on the desk of talk show host David Letterman. To prepare this took weeks. We hired an entomologist who provided slow-moving, camera-friendly cockroaches (the kind from under your stove don’t hang around for close-ups) and taught us to pick the bugs up without screaming like preadolescent girls. Then we built a secret compartment and worked out a devious routine for sneaking the compartment into the hat. More trouble than the trick was worth? To you, probably. But not to magicians.
Drag the coin of the edge of the table with your fingers and your thumb in a slanting position. Make sure your other hand is in a position to grab the coin once you drop it. The coin should never drop to the floor. Do not move the recipient hand at all as this may cause some audience members to be suspicious. Once the coin is safely in your other hand, the performance part kicks in. Pretend like you are still holding the coin with the first hand, in the same position like when you picked up the coin from the edge but this time the backside of your hand should face upward, while your fingers should be locked with your thumb as if you are actually holding the coin. The key here is to always ensure the audience will not be suspicious that you actually don’t have a coin in your hand.So make sure you do a good job of concealing that part of your fingers that is supposed to be holding the coin. Let the front side of your fingers face the audience while still maintaining that horizontal position for your hand like you want to bang something on the surface.Next, bang the ‘coin wielding’ palm on the table to give the impression that the ‘coin’ is actually passing through the table. Hit the underside of the table with the coin (which has been on your other hand all along) where the coin is supposed to go through to give an impression like the coin is falling on your other hand.
The magician asks someone from the audience to put their signature on a random card. Then he tears it into 4 pieces and magically restores the signed card in front of the amazed audience. The secret is quite simple: the illusionist has a folded card in his pocket, and he substitutes the signed card with it. The hidden card is torn, and the signed one is perfectly safe.
The human brain recognizes and is drawn to symmetry and patterns. Using patterns, structures, and routines—what scientists call mental models—makes people efficient. Routines are so ingrained that people can do them without thinking: getting dressed in the morning, driving to work, doing laundry. The ability to go on autopilot means their brain can use that time to think about something else entirely—a distinct evolutionary advantage.
In the past five years, magic—normally deemed fit only for children and tourists in Las Vegas—has become shockingly respectable in the scientific world. Even I—not exactly renowned as a public speaker—have been invited to address conferences on neuroscience and perception. I asked a scientist friend (whose identity I must protect), “Why the sudden interest?” He replied that those who fund science research find magicians “sexier than lab rats.”

The brain needs to perceive cause and effect. If people don’t see cause and effect in everyday life it confuses their brain and makes it impossible to function. Magicians create “magic moments”—the tapping of a magic wand or some other indication that magic is happening—so the brain attributes the effect to that action rather than the sleight of hand that is actually behind it. This triggers a gut-felt connection despite a lack of logical connection.
Magicians use sleight of hand in a wide variety of tricks, but one of the most popular genres of sleight of hand is in card magic. The following are basic sleight-of-hand techniques that card magicians perform with playing cards, both freestanding and at the card table. Such card manipulation takes years of practice to perfect, but these card flourishes will open up a world of possibilities.
Next, you will have to place the bottles into your freezer at a constant temperature of -24 degrees. You can set the temperature knob to 5 or 7. (Make sure you leave the bottles overnight outside the freezer before putting them in the Freezer. This is to make sure the bottles absorb the room temperature.) After inserting the bottles into the freezer, make sure they lie on their sides, and that the distances between them are equal. Close the freezer door and wait for one and a half hours. Open the door and check if the bottles are frozen. If they are not, quickly shut the door and keep checking after 15 minutes. It usually takes about between 2 hours and 30 minutes to 2 hours and forty five minutes for the first bottle to freeze. Don’t expect the bottle to completely freeze over. It will still be a liquid albeit with flakes of ice floating about. Gently take the bottles out slowly and make sure you have an audience present. Grab a bowl and fill it with some ice. Now open your bottle and pour out the water onto the ice. You will immediately notice that the water will freeze upon contact with the flakes creating unique cone flakes that you can give your friends. The best way to ensure success with this trick is to make sure you get the temperatures right. Over freezing or under freezing might result in the trick not working, so make sure you get the temperature just right.
Make a quarter vanish into thin air. Place a quarter in the palm of your dominant hand and tell your audience that you're going to make it disappear. Make sure it's resting right in the center of your middle and ring fingers—this will allow you to secretly cup the edges using your index and pinky fingers. Quickly pass your dominant hand over your opposite hand as though you've transferred the quarter, then let your dominant hand, which is still palming the coin, fall to your side. Open your empty hand and savor the look on your audience's faces as they try to figure out where the quarter went![1]
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