This trick will make it appear that you have punched a hole in a bill with a pen, but the bill magically restores itself or was never punched in the first place. This trick can really have your audience on the edge of their seats. Ask to borrow a bill from someone's wallet (your least favorite uncle, perhaps?) and make them think you've ruined it and then fix it for them all at once. They're sure to be surprised, relieved, and impressed all at once.
Quite simple, actually. The magician prepared a half back cover of an iPhone and quickly put it over the screen while performing the trick. When Dynamo shows his audience the iPhone, he shows it from the back. Then, covering the device with both hands, he rotates it entirely, showing the screen side with the half back cover over it. From the side it looks like the phone was twisted but we assure you that no iPhone was harmed that day.

The Effect: I cut a deck of cards a couple of times, and you glimpse flashes of several different cards. I turn the cards facedown and invite you to choose one, memorize it, and return it. Now I ask you to name your card. You say (for example), “The queen of hearts.” I take the deck in my mouth, bite down, and groan and wiggle to suggest that your card is going down my throat, through my intestines, into my bloodstream, and finally into my right foot. I lift that foot and invite you to pull off my shoe and look inside. You find the queen of hearts. You’re amazed. If you happen to pick up the deck later, you’ll find it’s missing the queen of hearts.

5. To fool the mind, combine at least two tricks. Every night in Las Vegas, I make a ball come to life like a trained dog. My method—the thing that fools your eye—is to puppeteer the ball with a thread too fine to be seen from the audience. But during the routine, the ball jumps through a wooden hoop several times, and that seems to rule out the possibility of a thread. The hoop is what magicians call misdirection, a second trick that “proves” the first. The hoop is genuine, but the deceptive choreography I use took 18 months to develop.
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In addition to manual dexterity, sleight of hand relies upon misdirection, psychological manipulation, timing, story, and natural choreography. An example from coin magic is the French drop, where the magician appears to transfer a coin from the right hand to the left hand but actually keeps the coin palmed in the original hand. By motivating the sleight, timing the drop to a moment when the left hand obscures the sleight, and selling misdirection by focusing on the left hand, the magician completely fools the audience.
Although it may seem like Hogwarts magic, the performance is quite easy. There’s a special v-shaped tunnel going under the wall. That is why the spectators who study the wall and how solid it is, don't find anything – the wall is ok, the floor is not. The magician needs just a fraction of a second to go through the small tunnel going under the wall and stand on the other side of it.
The art of card throwing generally consists of throwing standard playing cards with excessively high speed and accuracy, powerful enough to slice fruits like carrots and even melons.[11][12] Like flourishing, throwing cards are meant to be visibly impressive and does not include magic elements.[12] Magician Ricky Jay popularized throwing cards within the sleight of hand industry with the release of his 1977 book entitled Cards as Weapons, which was met with large sales and critical acclaim.[13] Some magic tricks, both close-up and on stage, are heavily connected to throwing cards.[14]
How to make a huge truck disappear when it's surrounded by the audience on all sides? Easy! All you need to do is drape a special construction over the truck, create a fake audience with your friends, and ask somebody to drive the truck out of the construction. When you take the drapes off, the truck is not there anymore. Now you understand why this trick may be seen only on TV.
Sleight of hand during stage magic performances is not common, as most magic events and stunts are performed with objects visible to a much larger audience, but is nevertheless done occasionally by many stage performers.[5] The most common magic tricks performed with sleight of hand on stage are rope manipulations and card tricks, with the first typically being done with a member of the audience to rule out the possibility of stooges and the latter primarily being done on a table while a camera is live-recording, allowing the rest of audience to see the performance on a big screen.[6][7] Worldwide acclaimed stage magician David Copperfield often includes illusions featuring sleight of hand in his stage shows.[7]
“The spotlight of attention.” When people don’t focus specifically on something, they don’t notice it. Even as their eyes receive visual input, their brain focuses only on what it considers to be important, the “spotlight of attention,” filtering out the rest. Also known as inattentional blindness, this phenomena allows the brain to function without abundant information overwhelming it. Magicians take advantage of this, directing focus to something unimportant so people don’t notice their sleight of hand moves.

Unlike card tricks done on the streets or on stage and card cheating, cardistry is solely about impressing without illusions, deceit, misdirection and other elements commonly used in card tricks and card cheating.[10] Cardistry is the art of card flourishing, and is intended to be visually impressive and to give the appearance of being difficult to perform.[10] Card flourishing is often associated with card tricks, but many sleight of hand artists perform flourishing without considering themselves magicians or having any real interest in card tricks.[10]


Unlike card tricks done on the streets or on stage and card cheating, cardistry is solely about impressing without illusions, deceit, misdirection and other elements commonly used in card tricks and card cheating.[10] Cardistry is the art of card flourishing, and is intended to be visually impressive and to give the appearance of being difficult to perform.[10] Card flourishing is often associated with card tricks, but many sleight of hand artists perform flourishing without considering themselves magicians or having any real interest in card tricks.[10]
The magic works like this; you hold a matchstick or a toothpick between your thumb and index finger, wave your hand around, and the matchstick magically disappears into thin air. Another wave of your hand, and the matchstick appears from out of nowhere. The trick is really simple, and you don’t need to have a sleeve coat or shirt. All you need is some tape or glue. Take the glue and smear sparingly onto the nail side of the thumb which will be used to hold the toothpick. Make sure you attach only the lower side of the stick so that a greater portion of it will appear during the trick. When you want to make the stick disappear, just cause a distraction to the audience, waft your hand around, and straighten all your fingers and thumb to hide the stick. If you want to make it re-appear, fold your thumb in a holding position and make sure the stick is visible. Make sure you hold the stick towards the audience and you can also use saliva if glue is not available. However, saliva will not prove to be an effective sticking agent like glue.
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