I’m all for helping science. But after I share what I know, my neuroscientist friends thank me by showing me eye-tracking and MRI equipment and promising that someday such machinery will help make me a better magician. I have my doubts. Neuroscientists are novices at deception. Magicians have done controlled testing in human perception for thousands of years.
The human mind is susceptible to suggestion. Magicians can make audiences remember events that didn’t even happen. For example, with limited audience participation and a few choice words, a performer can convince spectators that they shuffled a deck of cards when, in fact, the performer did, and theirs was a false shuffle of a stacked deck, retaining the order. Once the audience misremembers that they shuffled the deck, they eliminate the possibility of this misleading sleight of hand.
Drag the coin of the edge of the table with your fingers and your thumb in a slanting position. Make sure your other hand is in a position to grab the coin once you drop it. The coin should never drop to the floor. Do not move the recipient hand at all as this may cause some audience members to be suspicious. Once the coin is safely in your other hand, the performance part kicks in. Pretend like you are still holding the coin with the first hand, in the same position like when you picked up the coin from the edge but this time the backside of your hand should face upward, while your fingers should be locked with your thumb as if you are actually holding the coin. The key here is to always ensure the audience will not be suspicious that you actually don’t have a coin in your hand.So make sure you do a good job of concealing that part of your fingers that is supposed to be holding the coin. Let the front side of your fingers face the audience while still maintaining that horizontal position for your hand like you want to bang something on the surface.Next, bang the ‘coin wielding’ palm on the table to give the impression that the ‘coin’ is actually passing through the table. Hit the underside of the table with the coin (which has been on your other hand all along) where the coin is supposed to go through to give an impression like the coin is falling on your other hand.
In order to perform the illusion, Copperfield used an assistant for the latter part of his body. Together they seemed to be just a single person. The secret of this trick is in the table beneath and the tiny gap between the tables that the saw blade can easily pass through. Copperfield's legs were bent into the table, and the assistant’s upper body was hidden in the table below.
Pick up the coin with your decoy hand and fake a pass to your other hand. This is where the illusion comes in. While you're apologizing to the audience, snatch up the coin with the hand of the arm you were just rubbing and make a quick motion indicating that you're passing it back to your rubbing hand, only don't actually pass it. Instead, cup it in your palm and place your elbow back on the table.[19]
Some time ago, people wondered how David Copperfield managed to seemingly tear a folded dollar in half right in front of people, then unfold it to reveal that it had been completely undamaged. The secret here is making cunning use of a pencil: the latter has been cut in half diagonally and connected with strong magnets! This allows the banknote to be easily passed between the two magnetised halves and remain undamaged.
The One-Hand Cut. Known as a “Charlier” cut, this is when a magician uses a single hand to separate the deck into two portions, flipping the upper half and lower half to switch their positions. It adds a cool flourish to easy card tricks, and it’s a necessary move to progress to a more advanced card trick. Plus, it leaves an empty hand free to perform misdirection or additional sleights.

Some time ago, people wondered how David Copperfield managed to seemingly tear a folded dollar in half right in front of people, then unfold it to reveal that it had been completely undamaged. The secret here is making cunning use of a pencil: the latter has been cut in half diagonally and connected with strong magnets! This allows the banknote to be easily passed between the two magnetised halves and remain undamaged.


Sleight of hand is often used in close-up magic, where the sleights are performed with the audience close to the magician, usually in physical contact or within 3 to 4 m (10 to 13 ft).[3] This close contact eliminates theories of fake audience members and the use of gimmicks.[3] It makes use of everyday items as props, such as cards, coins, rubber bands, paper, phones and even saltshakers.[3] A well-performed sleight looks like an ordinary, natural and completely innocent gesture, change in hand position or body posture.[4] In addition to manual dexterity, sleight of hand in close-up magic depends on the use of psychology, timing, misdirection, and natural choreography in accomplishing a magical effect.[4]
If I told you that it really is possible to do this trick, you would brush me aside and tell me that I am getting ahead of my limits. But this is a simple trick, and you will be kicking yourself once you find out how easy it is to get it done. You will need to get yourself to a good spot in the house or premises. A corner in the house is the best place to get this trick done. The most important part of this magic trick is to make sure that the audience is neither in front of you, nor behind you. The most preferable position for your audience to be in is just at the edge of the heel of your shoe. They must also be a couple of meters away from you in a diagonal position.  Another very important aspect is balance. You will need a lot of balance in this trick. In fact, you should probably start practicing on your balance first before attempting anything else.

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