Quite simple, actually. The magician prepared a half back cover of an iPhone and quickly put it over the screen while performing the trick. When Dynamo shows his audience the iPhone, he shows it from the back. Then, covering the device with both hands, he rotates it entirely, showing the screen side with the half back cover over it. From the side it looks like the phone was twisted but we assure you that no iPhone was harmed that day.
In the past five years, magic—normally deemed fit only for children and tourists in Las Vegas—has become shockingly respectable in the scientific world. Even I—not exactly renowned as a public speaker—have been invited to address conferences on neuroscience and perception. I asked a scientist friend (whose identity I must protect), “Why the sudden interest?” He replied that those who fund science research find magicians “sexier than lab rats.”
The Effect: I cut a deck of cards a couple of times, and you glimpse flashes of several different cards. I turn the cards facedown and invite you to choose one, memorize it, and return it. Now I ask you to name your card. You say (for example), “The queen of hearts.” I take the deck in my mouth, bite down, and groan and wiggle to suggest that your card is going down my throat, through my intestines, into my bloodstream, and finally into my right foot. I lift that foot and invite you to pull off my shoe and look inside. You find the queen of hearts. You’re amazed. If you happen to pick up the deck later, you’ll find it’s missing the queen of hearts.
Although it may seem like Hogwarts magic, the performance is quite easy. There’s a special v-shaped tunnel going under the wall. That is why the spectators who study the wall and how solid it is, don't find anything – the wall is ok, the floor is not. The magician needs just a fraction of a second to go through the small tunnel going under the wall and stand on the other side of it.
The human brain recognizes and is drawn to symmetry and patterns. Using patterns, structures, and routines—what scientists call mental models—makes people efficient. Routines are so ingrained that people can do them without thinking: getting dressed in the morning, driving to work, doing laundry. The ability to go on autopilot means their brain can use that time to think about something else entirely—a distinct evolutionary advantage.

Magic is not Rocket Science. Professional magicians and illusionists will try to create the impression that magic is all about mystical and supernatural powers. The truth of the matter is that magic is all about performance, and tricks. Believe it or not, even the most complex acts you’ve seen out there are all about PERFORMANCE and TRICKS. What this means, therefore, is that anyone can become a magician; even you. You are probably a magic fan or enthusiast, with a burning desire to stand before an audience and see them applause at the end of your rousing performance. Well, it is possible for you to become a distinguished magician, but you will have to start from somewhere. You will have to start with the easy tricks that will give you much-needed experience and usher you into the next phase of professional illusion.

In order to perform the illusion, Copperfield used an assistant for the latter part of his body. Together they seemed to be just a single person. The secret of this trick is in the table beneath and the tiny gap between the tables that the saw blade can easily pass through. Copperfield's legs were bent into the table, and the assistant’s upper body was hidden in the table below.


Magicians use sleight of hand in a wide variety of tricks, but one of the most popular genres of sleight of hand is in card magic. The following are basic sleight-of-hand techniques that card magicians perform with playing cards, both freestanding and at the card table. Such card manipulation takes years of practice to perfect, but these card flourishes will open up a world of possibilities.
In addition to manual dexterity, sleight of hand relies upon misdirection, psychological manipulation, timing, story, and natural choreography. An example from coin magic is the French drop, where the magician appears to transfer a coin from the right hand to the left hand but actually keeps the coin palmed in the original hand. By motivating the sleight, timing the drop to a moment when the left hand obscures the sleight, and selling misdirection by focusing on the left hand, the magician completely fools the audience.
Magic is not Rocket Science. Professional magicians and illusionists will try to create the impression that magic is all about mystical and supernatural powers. The truth of the matter is that magic is all about performance, and tricks. Believe it or not, even the most complex acts you’ve seen out there are all about PERFORMANCE and TRICKS. What this means, therefore, is that anyone can become a magician; even you. You are probably a magic fan or enthusiast, with a burning desire to stand before an audience and see them applause at the end of your rousing performance. Well, it is possible for you to become a distinguished magician, but you will have to start from somewhere. You will have to start with the easy tricks that will give you much-needed experience and usher you into the next phase of professional illusion.
The magic here is when the magician, who is tightly grasping the coin, mysteriously makes it go through the table, just by banging it hard on the table surface. He then grabs the coin on the other side with his other hand before it falls down on the floor. Sounds easy enough, right? Well, it’s easy, after countless hours of practice and mastery. Here’s how to master this trick. You will have to really practice your hand speed because the whole trick rests on how fast your hands move the coin from the table. It’s a split-second affair. There are no holes punched on the table, and you don’t need long sleeves where you can hide the coin. It’s just a matter of how fast one hand gets the coin to the other. Like with most tricks, you will have to find a distraction for your audience. A good distraction that will shift their attention, enabling you to slide the coin from the table. Another important aspect of this trick is the performance. You will have to act like you are holding the coin, and banging it on the table. Here’s how it works. Ask an audience member to verify if the coin is real. Once the audience member gives the coin back, pretend like you want to get a good hold of the coin so as to begin the magic.

Rock up smoothly onto the ball of the foot furthest away from the audience. Transition your weight onto the ball of your support foot fluidly while allowing the foot the audience can see to hover 1–2 inches (2.5–5.1 cm) above the ground. Try to support yourself as far forward towards your toes as you can. If you do this just right, it will appear as though you've succeeded in levitating for a brief moment.[12]

×