The Double Undercut. By pushing down slightly on a card they are placing in the middle of the deck, the magician separates it from the top half of the deck. Then, by halving the bottom half of the deck, creating three total piles, they shift those piles, creating the illusion that the card is lost in the deck when in reality the magician brought it back to the top of the deck.

The floating coffee cup is almost like the disappearing toothpick trick but the difference here is that this magic trick is more realistic than the previous one. It is also simpler than the first which makes it very easy to perform. For starters, you will have to get some coffee cups for the trick. That’s all. This trick will need a lot of performance and creativity as well. Cut a really small hole in the Styrofoam on the side of the coffee cup. This hole should not be too small. It should be large enough to fit your
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The art of card throwing generally consists of throwing standard playing cards with excessively high speed and accuracy, powerful enough to slice fruits like carrots and even melons.[11][12] Like flourishing, throwing cards are meant to be visibly impressive and does not include magic elements.[12] Magician Ricky Jay popularized throwing cards within the sleight of hand industry with the release of his 1977 book entitled Cards as Weapons, which was met with large sales and critical acclaim.[13] Some magic tricks, both close-up and on stage, are heavily connected to throwing cards.[14]
2. Make the secret a lot more trouble than the trick seems worth. You will be fooled by a trick if it involves more time, money, and practice than you (or any other sane onlooker) would be willing to invest. My partner, Penn, and I once produced 500 live cockroaches from a top hat on the desk of talk show host David Letterman. To prepare this took weeks. We hired an entomologist who provided slow-moving, camera-friendly cockroaches (the kind from under your stove don’t hang around for close-ups) and taught us to pick the bugs up without screaming like preadolescent girls. Then we built a secret compartment and worked out a devious routine for sneaking the compartment into the hat. More trouble than the trick was worth? To you, probably. But not to magicians.
The magic here is when the magician, who is tightly grasping the coin, mysteriously makes it go through the table, just by banging it hard on the table surface. He then grabs the coin on the other side with his other hand before it falls down on the floor. Sounds easy enough, right? Well, it’s easy, after countless hours of practice and mastery. Here’s how to master this trick. You will have to really practice your hand speed because the whole trick rests on how fast your hands move the coin from the table. It’s a split-second affair. There are no holes punched on the table, and you don’t need long sleeves where you can hide the coin. It’s just a matter of how fast one hand gets the coin to the other. Like with most tricks, you will have to find a distraction for your audience. A good distraction that will shift their attention, enabling you to slide the coin from the table. Another important aspect of this trick is the performance. You will have to act like you are holding the coin, and banging it on the table. Here’s how it works. Ask an audience member to verify if the coin is real. Once the audience member gives the coin back, pretend like you want to get a good hold of the coin so as to begin the magic.
2. Make the secret a lot more trouble than the trick seems worth. You will be fooled by a trick if it involves more time, money, and practice than you (or any other sane onlooker) would be willing to invest. My partner, Penn, and I once produced 500 live cockroaches from a top hat on the desk of talk show host David Letterman. To prepare this took weeks. We hired an entomologist who provided slow-moving, camera-friendly cockroaches (the kind from under your stove don’t hang around for close-ups) and taught us to pick the bugs up without screaming like preadolescent girls. Then we built a secret compartment and worked out a devious routine for sneaking the compartment into the hat. More trouble than the trick was worth? To you, probably. But not to magicians.
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Spin a straw around the top of a bottle using only your mind. While no one is watching, take a paper-wrapped straw and rub your hand up and down its length a few times to generate static electricity. Be careful not to tear the thin paper wrapper. When you're ready to do the trick, lay the straw across the top of a bottle or another container with a narrow opening, with its center point directly over the mouth. Raise your hands over the ends of the straw and wave them forward and backward in a mystical manner. The static charge will cause it to rotate without you ever actually touching it.
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