In the past five years, magic—normally deemed fit only for children and tourists in Las Vegas—has become shockingly respectable in the scientific world. Even I—not exactly renowned as a public speaker—have been invited to address conferences on neuroscience and perception. I asked a scientist friend (whose identity I must protect), “Why the sudden interest?” He replied that those who fund science research find magicians “sexier than lab rats.”
When Alesha signed the note, Jamie folded it and showed the audience. While he was folding the note, he had a palmed piece of paper in his hands that he instantly switched to. Now, with the signed note still in his hand, he took a bag from Alesha and with the note in his hand reached into the bag, stuffed the lemon, and took it out, showing the audience only one side of it. When Alesha took out the note, he very quickly closed it and put it away because there was actually a hole in the bottom of the lemon where he stuffed the note inside.
How does it work? There are several ways of doing the trick and one of the most popular is all about the magic equipment. The magician wears a special finger stall with a small, but very sharp blade. After showing the audience that the bottle is whole, he secretly cuts a line in it that's big enough to push a phone through. No magic here, really. Just a sleight of hand.
The human mind is susceptible to suggestion. Magicians can make audiences remember events that didn’t even happen. For example, with limited audience participation and a few choice words, a performer can convince spectators that they shuffled a deck of cards when, in fact, the performer did, and theirs was a false shuffle of a stacked deck, retaining the order. Once the audience misremembers that they shuffled the deck, they eliminate the possibility of this misleading sleight of hand.

The feather that Darcy showed us before lightning it up is actually a piece of special paper known as flash paper. It is commonly used by magicians when they wish to create quick large flashes of fire in order to hide brisk moments of illusion from the audience. That's exactly what Darcy did - using the fire, he quickly got the pigeon from a secret pocket in his sleeve.
“The spotlight of attention.” When people don’t focus specifically on something, they don’t notice it. Even as their eyes receive visual input, their brain focuses only on what it considers to be important, the “spotlight of attention,” filtering out the rest. Also known as inattentional blindness, this phenomena allows the brain to function without abundant information overwhelming it. Magicians take advantage of this, directing focus to something unimportant so people don’t notice their sleight of hand moves.

The Double Lift. The magician lifts the top two cards as one, making it appear as if they only picked up the top card. When they show the card to the audience, spectators believe they are seeing the top card when it is actually the second card. Thus, when the top card is relocated within the deck, the magician retains the card the audience saw on top of the deck.
Next, you will have to place the bottles into your freezer at a constant temperature of -24 degrees. You can set the temperature knob to 5 or 7. (Make sure you leave the bottles overnight outside the freezer before putting them in the Freezer. This is to make sure the bottles absorb the room temperature.) After inserting the bottles into the freezer, make sure they lie on their sides, and that the distances between them are equal. Close the freezer door and wait for one and a half hours. Open the door and check if the bottles are frozen. If they are not, quickly shut the door and keep checking after 15 minutes. It usually takes about between 2 hours and 30 minutes to 2 hours and forty five minutes for the first bottle to freeze. Don’t expect the bottle to completely freeze over. It will still be a liquid albeit with flakes of ice floating about. Gently take the bottles out slowly and make sure you have an audience present. Grab a bowl and fill it with some ice. Now open your bottle and pour out the water onto the ice. You will immediately notice that the water will freeze upon contact with the flakes creating unique cone flakes that you can give your friends. The best way to ensure success with this trick is to make sure you get the temperatures right. Over freezing or under freezing might result in the trick not working, so make sure you get the temperature just right.
This would be a really useful and cool magic trick especially during the hot summers when all your friends just want to stay cool. This trick is more scientific than it is magic. You will be surprised at how easy it is to wow your friends with this one. You will need some purified bottled water that you can easily access at your local store. Make sure the water is purified, and for the trick to work efficiently, it has to be in a bottle. Also, don’t just purchase one bottle. Get numerous bottles. If you can get a six pack or a dozen, it would be really great. Remember, the more bottles you have, the higher your chances of getting the trick done.
6. Nothing fools you better than the lie you tell yourself. David P. Abbott was an Omaha magician who invented the basis of my ball trick back in 1907. He used to make a golden ball float around his parlor. After the show, Abbott would absentmindedly leave the ball on a bookshelf. Guests would sneak over, heft the ball, and find it was much heavier than a thread could support. So they were mystified. But the ball the audience had seen floating weighed only five ounces. The one on the bookshelf was a heavy duplicate, left out to entice the curious. When a magician lets you notice something on your own, his lie becomes impenetrable.
I’m all for helping science. But after I share what I know, my neuroscientist friends thank me by showing me eye-tracking and MRI equipment and promising that someday such machinery will help make me a better magician. I have my doubts. Neuroscientists are novices at deception. Magicians have done controlled testing in human perception for thousands of years.
When Alesha signed the note, Jamie folded it and showed the audience. While he was folding the note, he had a palmed piece of paper in his hands that he instantly switched to. Now, with the signed note still in his hand, he took a bag from Alesha and with the note in his hand reached into the bag, stuffed the lemon, and took it out, showing the audience only one side of it. When Alesha took out the note, he very quickly closed it and put it away because there was actually a hole in the bottom of the lemon where he stuffed the note inside.
Pick up the coin with your decoy hand and fake a pass to your other hand. This is where the illusion comes in. While you're apologizing to the audience, snatch up the coin with the hand of the arm you were just rubbing and make a quick motion indicating that you're passing it back to your rubbing hand, only don't actually pass it. Instead, cup it in your palm and place your elbow back on the table.[19]
×