2. Make the secret a lot more trouble than the trick seems worth. You will be fooled by a trick if it involves more time, money, and practice than you (or any other sane onlooker) would be willing to invest. My partner, Penn, and I once produced 500 live cockroaches from a top hat on the desk of talk show host David Letterman. To prepare this took weeks. We hired an entomologist who provided slow-moving, camera-friendly cockroaches (the kind from under your stove don’t hang around for close-ups) and taught us to pick the bugs up without screaming like preadolescent girls. Then we built a secret compartment and worked out a devious routine for sneaking the compartment into the hat. More trouble than the trick was worth? To you, probably. But not to magicians.
If I told you that it really is possible to do this trick, you would brush me aside and tell me that I am getting ahead of my limits. But this is a simple trick, and you will be kicking yourself once you find out how easy it is to get it done. You will need to get yourself to a good spot in the house or premises. A corner in the house is the best place to get this trick done. The most important part of this magic trick is to make sure that the audience is neither in front of you, nor behind you. The most preferable position for your audience to be in is just at the edge of the heel of your shoe. They must also be a couple of meters away from you in a diagonal position.  Another very important aspect is balance. You will need a lot of balance in this trick. In fact, you should probably start practicing on your balance first before attempting anything else.
This extremely simple trick attempts defy the laws of gravity by enabling a ring, to go in an upward direction without being pushed. It is a very unique magic trick because you only need basic objects to perform it. You will need a rubber band string and a ring. Pass the rubber band through the ring. Hold both sides of the rubber band and stretch. The ring will start going in an upward motion instead of going down as is expected. Your audience will be dazzled.
The brain simplifies and streamlines. By relying on experience, logic, and generalization, people make assumptions about the things they see, so they don’t have to stop and examine every single object they encounter. Magicians exploit people’s instantaneous assumptions, particularly the ones people make about the side of objects that they cannot see.
Although it may seem like Hogwarts magic, the performance is quite easy. There’s a special v-shaped tunnel going under the wall. That is why the spectators who study the wall and how solid it is, don't find anything – the wall is ok, the floor is not. The magician needs just a fraction of a second to go through the small tunnel going under the wall and stand on the other side of it.
In 1983, David Copperfield made the Statue of Liberty disappear completely. The trick can be explained very simply. The Statue was draped with a huge piece of fabric or covered by a big screen put in front of the audience. The whole illumination of the monument was turned off except for the spotlights. This simple preparation created the illusion of hollow space, and the set of lights blinded the audience. After the monument was unveiled, people were not able to see it because their vision was temporarily blurred by the spotlights.
Bend and re-straighten any spoon instantly. Hold the spoon upside down with the head pressed against a table or similar surface and act like you're gripping the handle firmly in both fists. Instead of actually wrapping your hands around the spoon, loop the pinky finger of your bottom hand around the point on handle directly above the head and keep the rest of your fingers poised just in front of the handle, along with your entire top hand. Push both fists down towards the tabletop as though you're bending the spoon by force while slowly lowering the handle to a horizontal angle. Finish the trick by quickly reversing the motion and magically restoring the spoon to its original shape.[2]
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