In order to perform the illusion, Copperfield used an assistant for the latter part of his body. Together they seemed to be just a single person. The secret of this trick is in the table beneath and the tiny gap between the tables that the saw blade can easily pass through. Copperfield's legs were bent into the table, and the assistant’s upper body was hidden in the table below.
The human brain recognizes and is drawn to symmetry and patterns. Using patterns, structures, and routines—what scientists call mental models—makes people efficient. Routines are so ingrained that people can do them without thinking: getting dressed in the morning, driving to work, doing laundry. The ability to go on autopilot means their brain can use that time to think about something else entirely—a distinct evolutionary advantage.
The magic here is when the magician, who is tightly grasping the coin, mysteriously makes it go through the table, just by banging it hard on the table surface. He then grabs the coin on the other side with his other hand before it falls down on the floor. Sounds easy enough, right? Well, it’s easy, after countless hours of practice and mastery. Here’s how to master this trick. You will have to really practice your hand speed because the whole trick rests on how fast your hands move the coin from the table. It’s a split-second affair. There are no holes punched on the table, and you don’t need long sleeves where you can hide the coin. It’s just a matter of how fast one hand gets the coin to the other. Like with most tricks, you will have to find a distraction for your audience. A good distraction that will shift their attention, enabling you to slide the coin from the table. Another important aspect of this trick is the performance. You will have to act like you are holding the coin, and banging it on the table. Here’s how it works. Ask an audience member to verify if the coin is real. Once the audience member gives the coin back, pretend like you want to get a good hold of the coin so as to begin the magic.
Make a quarter vanish into thin air. Place a quarter in the palm of your dominant hand and tell your audience that you're going to make it disappear. Make sure it's resting right in the center of your middle and ring fingers—this will allow you to secretly cup the edges using your index and pinky fingers. Quickly pass your dominant hand over your opposite hand as though you've transferred the quarter, then let your dominant hand, which is still palming the coin, fall to your side. Open your empty hand and savor the look on your audience's faces as they try to figure out where the quarter went![1]
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