The One-Hand Cut. Known as a “Charlier” cut, this is when a magician uses a single hand to separate the deck into two portions, flipping the upper half and lower half to switch their positions. It adds a cool flourish to easy card tricks, and it’s a necessary move to progress to a more advanced card trick. Plus, it leaves an empty hand free to perform misdirection or additional sleights.
In 1983, David Copperfield made the Statue of Liberty disappear completely. The trick can be explained very simply. The Statue was draped with a huge piece of fabric or covered by a big screen put in front of the audience. The whole illumination of the monument was turned off except for the spotlights. This simple preparation created the illusion of hollow space, and the set of lights blinded the audience. After the monument was unveiled, people were not able to see it because their vision was temporarily blurred by the spotlights.

The human brain recognizes and is drawn to symmetry and patterns. Using patterns, structures, and routines—what scientists call mental models—makes people efficient. Routines are so ingrained that people can do them without thinking: getting dressed in the morning, driving to work, doing laundry. The ability to go on autopilot means their brain can use that time to think about something else entirely—a distinct evolutionary advantage.

Here is how to get it done. Get to your designated corner in the house, and make sure the audience is in the right location. It’s pretty easy. Lift your right leg and make sure it does not go up bent. Ensure it is always straight as it goes up. Also, let your hands not hold onto anything when performing the trick. You will find yourself levitating. How? You ask. Well, remember your left leg? Your left leg will perform a critical function to aid the trick. Lift your left leg with your toes, almost like a Ballerina dancer but not up to your tip toe. (But if you can, the better.) Make sure your right leg always conceals your left leg which is not levitating, and make sure it is always straight. It will really look like both of your legs are levitating. You should also ensure that your feet are together always.Also, as your left foot moves up slowly push your right foot downwards so as to further conceal your left foot.Balance is key here, so make sure you practice a lot before attempting this trick.
The human mind is susceptible to suggestion. Magicians can make audiences remember events that didn’t even happen. For example, with limited audience participation and a few choice words, a performer can convince spectators that they shuffled a deck of cards when, in fact, the performer did, and theirs was a false shuffle of a stacked deck, retaining the order. Once the audience misremembers that they shuffled the deck, they eliminate the possibility of this misleading sleight of hand.
Sleight of hand during stage magic performances is not common, as most magic events and stunts are performed with objects visible to a much larger audience, but is nevertheless done occasionally by many stage performers.[5] The most common magic tricks performed with sleight of hand on stage are rope manipulations and card tricks, with the first typically being done with a member of the audience to rule out the possibility of stooges and the latter primarily being done on a table while a camera is live-recording, allowing the rest of audience to see the performance on a big screen.[6][7] Worldwide acclaimed stage magician David Copperfield often includes illusions featuring sleight of hand in his stage shows.[7]
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Now I wiggle the card to my shoe (No. 3: If you’re laughing …). When I lift whichever foot has your card, or invite you to take my wallet from my back pocket, I turn away (No. 4: Outside the frame) and swap the deck for a normal one from which I’ve removed all three possible selections (No. 5: Combine two tricks). Then I set the deck down to tempt you to examine it later and notice your card is missing (No. 6: The lie you tell yourself).
get a large piece of the band inside your palms. Hold one end of the remaining band with your fingers while also holding the other end. You will notice that when you slowly pull one side of the shortened band, the ring will appear like it’s climbing the band. This is brought about by the stretching nature of the band which drags it upwards. You can distract your audience by constantly staring at the ring as it goes up so that they will think that your mind is controlling the ring.
5. To fool the mind, combine at least two tricks. Every night in Las Vegas, I make a ball come to life like a trained dog. My method—the thing that fools your eye—is to puppeteer the ball with a thread too fine to be seen from the audience. But during the routine, the ball jumps through a wooden hoop several times, and that seems to rule out the possibility of a thread. The hoop is what magicians call misdirection, a second trick that “proves” the first. The hoop is genuine, but the deceptive choreography I use took 18 months to develop.
6. Nothing fools you better than the lie you tell yourself. David P. Abbott was an Omaha magician who invented the basis of my ball trick back in 1907. He used to make a golden ball float around his parlor. After the show, Abbott would absentmindedly leave the ball on a bookshelf. Guests would sneak over, heft the ball, and find it was much heavier than a thread could support. So they were mystified. But the ball the audience had seen floating weighed only five ounces. The one on the bookshelf was a heavy duplicate, left out to entice the curious. When a magician lets you notice something on your own, his lie becomes impenetrable.
Drag the coin of the edge of the table with your fingers and your thumb in a slanting position. Make sure your other hand is in a position to grab the coin once you drop it. The coin should never drop to the floor. Do not move the recipient hand at all as this may cause some audience members to be suspicious. Once the coin is safely in your other hand, the performance part kicks in. Pretend like you are still holding the coin with the first hand, in the same position like when you picked up the coin from the edge but this time the backside of your hand should face upward, while your fingers should be locked with your thumb as if you are actually holding the coin. The key here is to always ensure the audience will not be suspicious that you actually don’t have a coin in your hand.So make sure you do a good job of concealing that part of your fingers that is supposed to be holding the coin. Let the front side of your fingers face the audience while still maintaining that horizontal position for your hand like you want to bang something on the surface.Next, bang the ‘coin wielding’ palm on the table to give the impression that the ‘coin’ is actually passing through the table. Hit the underside of the table with the coin (which has been on your other hand all along) where the coin is supposed to go through to give an impression like the coin is falling on your other hand.
Remember that ’gravity-defying’ lean which Michael Jackson and his dancers performed in the video for the song ’Smooth Criminal’? It looks incredible, as Michael keeps his entire body straight whilst bending his ankles at an acute 45-degree angle. The secret here is in the specially-designed shoes he used, which had a heel that locked into pegs on the floor. With his feet effectively hooked to the ground, Michael was able to perform a seemingly impossible physical manoeuvre.

Remember that ’gravity-defying’ lean which Michael Jackson and his dancers performed in the video for the song ’Smooth Criminal’? It looks incredible, as Michael keeps his entire body straight whilst bending his ankles at an acute 45-degree angle. The secret here is in the specially-designed shoes he used, which had a heel that locked into pegs on the floor. With his feet effectively hooked to the ground, Michael was able to perform a seemingly impossible physical manoeuvre.


2. Make the secret a lot more trouble than the trick seems worth. You will be fooled by a trick if it involves more time, money, and practice than you (or any other sane onlooker) would be willing to invest. My partner, Penn, and I once produced 500 live cockroaches from a top hat on the desk of talk show host David Letterman. To prepare this took weeks. We hired an entomologist who provided slow-moving, camera-friendly cockroaches (the kind from under your stove don’t hang around for close-ups) and taught us to pick the bugs up without screaming like preadolescent girls. Then we built a secret compartment and worked out a devious routine for sneaking the compartment into the hat. More trouble than the trick was worth? To you, probably. But not to magicians.
The Effect: I cut a deck of cards a couple of times, and you glimpse flashes of several different cards. I turn the cards facedown and invite you to choose one, memorize it, and return it. Now I ask you to name your card. You say (for example), “The queen of hearts.” I take the deck in my mouth, bite down, and groan and wiggle to suggest that your card is going down my throat, through my intestines, into my bloodstream, and finally into my right foot. I lift that foot and invite you to pull off my shoe and look inside. You find the queen of hearts. You’re amazed. If you happen to pick up the deck later, you’ll find it’s missing the queen of hearts.

Make a pencil float in the palm of your hand. This one is as easy as can be—just clutch a pencil in one fist with the back of your hand facing the audience, then grab your wrist with your opposite hand like you're bracing yourself for a great effort. Without attracting attention, slowly outstretch the pointer finger of your support hand and use it to pin the pencil to your palm as you open your fist. When done correctly, it will look like the pencil is hovering in front of your hand.[4]
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