The Double Undercut. By pushing down slightly on a card they are placing in the middle of the deck, the magician separates it from the top half of the deck. Then, by halving the bottom half of the deck, creating three total piles, they shift those piles, creating the illusion that the card is lost in the deck when in reality the magician brought it back to the top of the deck.
How does it work? There are several ways of doing the trick and one of the most popular is all about the magic equipment. The magician wears a special finger stall with a small, but very sharp blade. After showing the audience that the bottle is whole, he secretly cuts a line in it that's big enough to push a phone through. No magic here, really. Just a sleight of hand.
Magic is not Rocket Science. Professional magicians and illusionists will try to create the impression that magic is all about mystical and supernatural powers. The truth of the matter is that magic is all about performance, and tricks. Believe it or not, even the most complex acts you’ve seen out there are all about PERFORMANCE and TRICKS. What this means, therefore, is that anyone can become a magician; even you. You are probably a magic fan or enthusiast, with a burning desire to stand before an audience and see them applause at the end of your rousing performance. Well, it is possible for you to become a distinguished magician, but you will have to start from somewhere. You will have to start with the easy tricks that will give you much-needed experience and usher you into the next phase of professional illusion.
Make a quarter vanish into thin air. Place a quarter in the palm of your dominant hand and tell your audience that you're going to make it disappear. Make sure it's resting right in the center of your middle and ring fingers—this will allow you to secretly cup the edges using your index and pinky fingers. Quickly pass your dominant hand over your opposite hand as though you've transferred the quarter, then let your dominant hand, which is still palming the coin, fall to your side. Open your empty hand and savor the look on your audience's faces as they try to figure out where the quarter went![1]
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