The word sleight, meaning "the use of dexterity or cunning, especially so as to deceive", comes from the Old Norse.[1] The phrase sleight of hand means "quick fingers" or "trickster fingers".[1] Common synonyms of Latin and French include prestidigitation and legerdemain respectively.[1] Seneca the Younger, philosopher of the Silver Age of Latin literature, famously compared rhetorical techniques and illusionist techniques.[2]
Spin a straw around the top of a bottle using only your mind. While no one is watching, take a paper-wrapped straw and rub your hand up and down its length a few times to generate static electricity. Be careful not to tear the thin paper wrapper. When you're ready to do the trick, lay the straw across the top of a bottle or another container with a narrow opening, with its center point directly over the mouth. Raise your hands over the ends of the straw and wave them forward and backward in a mystical manner. The static charge will cause it to rotate without you ever actually touching it.
A magician needs specially cut screens to move a hand through mirror or glass. The back screen covers 2 mirror panels. When the performance begins, the whole construction shifts the real mirror to the back side, moving 2 fake mirror panels forward. Now there is a space to move a hand. At the end of the performance, the assistants shift the real mirror to the front side again.
The feather that Darcy showed us before lightning it up is actually a piece of special paper known as flash paper. It is commonly used by magicians when they wish to create quick large flashes of fire in order to hide brisk moments of illusion from the audience. That's exactly what Darcy did - using the fire, he quickly got the pigeon from a secret pocket in his sleeve.
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Spin a straw around the top of a bottle using only your mind. While no one is watching, take a paper-wrapped straw and rub your hand up and down its length a few times to generate static electricity. Be careful not to tear the thin paper wrapper. When you're ready to do the trick, lay the straw across the top of a bottle or another container with a narrow opening, with its center point directly over the mouth. Raise your hands over the ends of the straw and wave them forward and backward in a mystical manner. The static charge will cause it to rotate without you ever actually touching it.
I’m all for helping science. But after I share what I know, my neuroscientist friends thank me by showing me eye-tracking and MRI equipment and promising that someday such machinery will help make me a better magician. I have my doubts. Neuroscientists are novices at deception. Magicians have done controlled testing in human perception for thousands of years.
For some performers, learning to swallow a sword can take years as it is an extremely dangerous practice. However, fakirs from all over the world amaze people with the ability to easily swallow a sword. The trick requires lots of physical and psychological preparation. The illusionist positions his head up so that his throat and stomach make a straight line and will not be hurt by the sword.
This is probably the simplest trick in the list. All you have to do is fill the bag ¾ way and drive the pencil into the bag. You will notice that the water won’t spill and the explanation is scientific. Plastic bags like Ziploc bags are polymers which have long bonds and chains. When the pencil enters the polymer, its molecules form a shield around the pencil trapping the water molecules. But this is your secret. No one in the audience has to know about it.
Some time ago, people wondered how David Copperfield managed to seemingly tear a folded dollar in half right in front of people, then unfold it to reveal that it had been completely undamaged. The secret here is making cunning use of a pencil: the latter has been cut in half diagonally and connected with strong magnets! This allows the banknote to be easily passed between the two magnetised halves and remain undamaged.
Make a quarter vanish into thin air. Place a quarter in the palm of your dominant hand and tell your audience that you're going to make it disappear. Make sure it's resting right in the center of your middle and ring fingers—this will allow you to secretly cup the edges using your index and pinky fingers. Quickly pass your dominant hand over your opposite hand as though you've transferred the quarter, then let your dominant hand, which is still palming the coin, fall to your side. Open your empty hand and savor the look on your audience's faces as they try to figure out where the quarter went![1]
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