A glass of water is placed on the table which is covered with a handkerchief. Then, the magician lifts it up and throws it into the air. The result: the handkerchief falls on the floor, and the glass disappears. The trick here is two-fold: firstly, there’s a wire ring sewn into the handkerchief, which creates the illusion that the glass is underneath the handkerchief. Secondly, the glass is then lowered into a secret pouch through a hole in the table.
Smash a cup through a table “accidentally.” Explain to your audience that you're going to pass a magical ball through a solid tabletop using a small cup and a “cloak of concealment” (an ordinary piece of paper). Place the cup upside down over the ball, then mold the paper around the cup so that it covers it completely. Pick up the paper-covered cup to give your audience one last look at the ball. As you do, drop the cup into your lap inconspicuously and cradle it between your thighs. Put the cup-shaped paper shell back over the ball and give it a smack. Remove the cloak to show that the ball is still there, but the cup has rematerialized beneath the table.[8]
For starters, you will have to get some coffee cups for the trick. That’s all. This trick will need a lot of performance and creativity as well. Cut a really small hole in the Styrofoam on the side of the coffee cup. This hole should not be too small. It should be large enough to fit your right-hand thumb. Stick your thumb into the Styrofoam discretely. Next, gently lift both of your hands simultaneously before your audience while distracting them with magic sounds and finger waving in a levitating motion. Try to keep the cup in the middle of both of your hands for a better illusion. It will really look like the cup is floating.
Sleight of hand is often used in close-up magic, where the sleights are performed with the audience close to the magician, usually in physical contact or within 3 to 4 m (10 to 13 ft).[3] This close contact eliminates theories of fake audience members and the use of gimmicks.[3] It makes use of everyday items as props, such as cards, coins, rubber bands, paper, phones and even saltshakers.[3] A well-performed sleight looks like an ordinary, natural and completely innocent gesture, change in hand position or body posture.[4] In addition to manual dexterity, sleight of hand in close-up magic depends on the use of psychology, timing, misdirection, and natural choreography in accomplishing a magical effect.[4]
There's plenty of magic to go around with these easy magic tricks. Whether it be levitating cards and pencils, poking holes in money and fixing them as if they never happened, or bending a spoon there is a trick that you can learn to impress any audience of family or friends. All of these tricks use items that you can find around your house so there's no need to go out and buy anything extra. They're very easy and simple to learn and perform so kids will love them.
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