Make a pencil float in the palm of your hand. This one is as easy as can be—just clutch a pencil in one fist with the back of your hand facing the audience, then grab your wrist with your opposite hand like you're bracing yourself for a great effort. Without attracting attention, slowly outstretch the pointer finger of your support hand and use it to pin the pencil to your palm as you open your fist. When done correctly, it will look like the pencil is hovering in front of your hand.[4]
When Alesha signed the note, Jamie folded it and showed the audience. While he was folding the note, he had a palmed piece of paper in his hands that he instantly switched to. Now, with the signed note still in his hand, he took a bag from Alesha and with the note in his hand reached into the bag, stuffed the lemon, and took it out, showing the audience only one side of it. When Alesha took out the note, he very quickly closed it and put it away because there was actually a hole in the bottom of the lemon where he stuffed the note inside.
When Alesha signed the note, Jamie folded it and showed the audience. While he was folding the note, he had a palmed piece of paper in his hands that he instantly switched to. Now, with the signed note still in his hand, he took a bag from Alesha and with the note in his hand reached into the bag, stuffed the lemon, and took it out, showing the audience only one side of it. When Alesha took out the note, he very quickly closed it and put it away because there was actually a hole in the bottom of the lemon where he stuffed the note inside.
Sleight of hand is often used in close-up magic, where the sleights are performed with the audience close to the magician, usually in physical contact or within 3 to 4 m (10 to 13 ft).[3] This close contact eliminates theories of fake audience members and the use of gimmicks.[3] It makes use of everyday items as props, such as cards, coins, rubber bands, paper, phones and even saltshakers.[3] A well-performed sleight looks like an ordinary, natural and completely innocent gesture, change in hand position or body posture.[4] In addition to manual dexterity, sleight of hand in close-up magic depends on the use of psychology, timing, misdirection, and natural choreography in accomplishing a magical effect.[4]

The human mind is susceptible to suggestion. Magicians can make audiences remember events that didn’t even happen. For example, with limited audience participation and a few choice words, a performer can convince spectators that they shuffled a deck of cards when, in fact, the performer did, and theirs was a false shuffle of a stacked deck, retaining the order. Once the audience misremembers that they shuffled the deck, they eliminate the possibility of this misleading sleight of hand.
In order to perform the illusion, Copperfield used an assistant for the latter part of his body. Together they seemed to be just a single person. The secret of this trick is in the table beneath and the tiny gap between the tables that the saw blade can easily pass through. Copperfield's legs were bent into the table, and the assistant’s upper body was hidden in the table below.
The human mind is susceptible to suggestion. Magicians can make audiences remember events that didn’t even happen. For example, with limited audience participation and a few choice words, a performer can convince spectators that they shuffled a deck of cards when, in fact, the performer did, and theirs was a false shuffle of a stacked deck, retaining the order. Once the audience misremembers that they shuffled the deck, they eliminate the possibility of this misleading sleight of hand.

Some time ago, people wondered how David Copperfield managed to seemingly tear a folded dollar in half right in front of people, then unfold it to reveal that it had been completely undamaged. The secret here is making cunning use of a pencil: the latter has been cut in half diagonally and connected with strong magnets! This allows the banknote to be easily passed between the two magnetised halves and remain undamaged.
There's plenty of magic to go around with these easy magic tricks. Whether it be levitating cards and pencils, poking holes in money and fixing them as if they never happened, or bending a spoon there is a trick that you can learn to impress any audience of family or friends. All of these tricks use items that you can find around your house so there's no need to go out and buy anything extra. They're very easy and simple to learn and perform so kids will love them.
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