Drag the coin of the edge of the table with your fingers and your thumb in a slanting position. Make sure your other hand is in a position to grab the coin once you drop it. The coin should never drop to the floor. Do not move the recipient hand at all as this may cause some audience members to be suspicious. Once the coin is safely in your other hand, the performance part kicks in. Pretend like you are still holding the coin with the first hand, in the same position like when you picked up the coin from the edge but this time the backside of your hand should face upward, while your fingers should be locked with your thumb as if you are actually holding the coin. The key here is to always ensure the audience will not be suspicious that you actually don’t have a coin in your hand.So make sure you do a good job of concealing that part of your fingers that is supposed to be holding the coin. Let the front side of your fingers face the audience while still maintaining that horizontal position for your hand like you want to bang something on the surface.Next, bang the ‘coin wielding’ palm on the table to give the impression that the ‘coin’ is actually passing through the table. Hit the underside of the table with the coin (which has been on your other hand all along) where the coin is supposed to go through to give an impression like the coin is falling on your other hand.
The human mind is susceptible to suggestion. Magicians can make audiences remember events that didn’t even happen. For example, with limited audience participation and a few choice words, a performer can convince spectators that they shuffled a deck of cards when, in fact, the performer did, and theirs was a false shuffle of a stacked deck, retaining the order. Once the audience misremembers that they shuffled the deck, they eliminate the possibility of this misleading sleight of hand.
The human mind is susceptible to suggestion. Magicians can make audiences remember events that didn’t even happen. For example, with limited audience participation and a few choice words, a performer can convince spectators that they shuffled a deck of cards when, in fact, the performer did, and theirs was a false shuffle of a stacked deck, retaining the order. Once the audience misremembers that they shuffled the deck, they eliminate the possibility of this misleading sleight of hand.
The brain needs to perceive cause and effect. If people don’t see cause and effect in everyday life it confuses their brain and makes it impossible to function. Magicians create “magic moments”—the tapping of a magic wand or some other indication that magic is happening—so the brain attributes the effect to that action rather than the sleight of hand that is actually behind it. This triggers a gut-felt connection despite a lack of logical connection.
The magic works like this; you hold a matchstick or a toothpick between your thumb and index finger, wave your hand around, and the matchstick magically disappears into thin air. Another wave of your hand, and the matchstick appears from out of nowhere. The trick is really simple, and you don’t need to have a sleeve coat or shirt. All you need is some tape or glue. Take the glue and smear sparingly onto the nail side of the thumb which will be used to hold the toothpick. Make sure you attach only the lower side of the stick so that a greater portion of it will appear during the trick. When you want to make the stick disappear, just cause a distraction to the audience, waft your hand around, and straighten all your fingers and thumb to hide the stick. If you want to make it re-appear, fold your thumb in a holding position and make sure the stick is visible. Make sure you hold the stick towards the audience and you can also use saliva if glue is not available. However, saliva will not prove to be an effective sticking agent like glue.
There's plenty of magic to go around with these easy magic tricks. Whether it be levitating cards and pencils, poking holes in money and fixing them as if they never happened, or bending a spoon there is a trick that you can learn to impress any audience of family or friends. All of these tricks use items that you can find around your house so there's no need to go out and buy anything extra. They're very easy and simple to learn and perform so kids will love them.
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