The Double Undercut. By pushing down slightly on a card they are placing in the middle of the deck, the magician separates it from the top half of the deck. Then, by halving the bottom half of the deck, creating three total piles, they shift those piles, creating the illusion that the card is lost in the deck when in reality the magician brought it back to the top of the deck.
How does it work? There are several ways of doing the trick and one of the most popular is all about the magic equipment. The magician wears a special finger stall with a small, but very sharp blade. After showing the audience that the bottle is whole, he secretly cuts a line in it that's big enough to push a phone through. No magic here, really. Just a sleight of hand.
Smash a cup through a table “accidentally.” Explain to your audience that you're going to pass a magical ball through a solid tabletop using a small cup and a “cloak of concealment” (an ordinary piece of paper). Place the cup upside down over the ball, then mold the paper around the cup so that it covers it completely. Pick up the paper-covered cup to give your audience one last look at the ball. As you do, drop the cup into your lap inconspicuously and cradle it between your thighs. Put the cup-shaped paper shell back over the ball and give it a smack. Remove the cloak to show that the ball is still there, but the cup has rematerialized beneath the table.[8]
In order to perform the illusion, Copperfield used an assistant for the latter part of his body. Together they seemed to be just a single person. The secret of this trick is in the table beneath and the tiny gap between the tables that the saw blade can easily pass through. Copperfield's legs were bent into the table, and the assistant’s upper body was hidden in the table below.

The brain needs to perceive cause and effect. If people don’t see cause and effect in everyday life it confuses their brain and makes it impossible to function. Magicians create “magic moments”—the tapping of a magic wand or some other indication that magic is happening—so the brain attributes the effect to that action rather than the sleight of hand that is actually behind it. This triggers a gut-felt connection despite a lack of logical connection.
For some performers, learning to swallow a sword can take years as it is an extremely dangerous practice. However, fakirs from all over the world amaze people with the ability to easily swallow a sword. The trick requires lots of physical and psychological preparation. The illusionist positions his head up so that his throat and stomach make a straight line and will not be hurt by the sword.
Make a pencil float in the palm of your hand. This one is as easy as can be—just clutch a pencil in one fist with the back of your hand facing the audience, then grab your wrist with your opposite hand like you're bracing yourself for a great effort. Without attracting attention, slowly outstretch the pointer finger of your support hand and use it to pin the pencil to your palm as you open your fist. When done correctly, it will look like the pencil is hovering in front of your hand.[4]
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