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The brain simplifies and streamlines. By relying on experience, logic, and generalization, people make assumptions about the things they see, so they don’t have to stop and examine every single object they encounter. Magicians exploit people’s instantaneous assumptions, particularly the ones people make about the side of objects that they cannot see.

The skill of a magician lies in his or her ability to keep you frozen in expectation of their next unbelievable trick. It often seems that magicians really are capable of doing things which defy all known laws of the universe, and the atmosphere of awe they create during their performances helps further reduce any doubts you have that this is all a trick.
If I told you that it really is possible to do this trick, you would brush me aside and tell me that I am getting ahead of my limits. But this is a simple trick, and you will be kicking yourself once you find out how easy it is to get it done. You will need to get yourself to a good spot in the house or premises. A corner in the house is the best place to get this trick done. The most important part of this magic trick is to make sure that the audience is neither in front of you, nor behind you. The most preferable position for your audience to be in is just at the edge of the heel of your shoe. They must also be a couple of meters away from you in a diagonal position.  Another very important aspect is balance. You will need a lot of balance in this trick. In fact, you should probably start practicing on your balance first before attempting anything else.

Although it may seem like Hogwarts magic, the performance is quite easy. There’s a special v-shaped tunnel going under the wall. That is why the spectators who study the wall and how solid it is, don't find anything – the wall is ok, the floor is not. The magician needs just a fraction of a second to go through the small tunnel going under the wall and stand on the other side of it.
In order to perform the illusion, Copperfield used an assistant for the latter part of his body. Together they seemed to be just a single person. The secret of this trick is in the table beneath and the tiny gap between the tables that the saw blade can easily pass through. Copperfield's legs were bent into the table, and the assistant’s upper body was hidden in the table below.
This is probably the simplest trick in the list. All you have to do is fill the bag ¾ way and drive the pencil into the bag. You will notice that the water won’t spill and the explanation is scientific. Plastic bags like Ziploc bags are polymers which have long bonds and chains. When the pencil enters the polymer, its molecules form a shield around the pencil trapping the water molecules. But this is your secret. No one in the audience has to know about it.

Pass an ordinary piece of paper around your body. Bet your skeptical audience that you can cut a hole in a normal piece of typing paper large enough to step through. Fold the paper in half widthwise and cut a series of strips through the folded edge every 2 in (5.1 cm) or so, stopping about 1 in (2.5 cm) from the far end. Then, rotate the paper 180 degrees and cut along the midline of each strip you just cut from the opposite side, again stopping just short of the far edge. Finally, cut through each folded crease individually and open up the paper to reveal an impossibly-large paper portal that you can slip right through.[6]
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