Pass an ordinary piece of paper around your body. Bet your skeptical audience that you can cut a hole in a normal piece of typing paper large enough to step through. Fold the paper in half widthwise and cut a series of strips through the folded edge every 2 in (5.1 cm) or so, stopping about 1 in (2.5 cm) from the far end. Then, rotate the paper 180 degrees and cut along the midline of each strip you just cut from the opposite side, again stopping just short of the far edge. Finally, cut through each folded crease individually and open up the paper to reveal an impossibly-large paper portal that you can slip right through.[6]
The art of card throwing generally consists of throwing standard playing cards with excessively high speed and accuracy, powerful enough to slice fruits like carrots and even melons.[11][12] Like flourishing, throwing cards are meant to be visibly impressive and does not include magic elements.[12] Magician Ricky Jay popularized throwing cards within the sleight of hand industry with the release of his 1977 book entitled Cards as Weapons, which was met with large sales and critical acclaim.[13] Some magic tricks, both close-up and on stage, are heavily connected to throwing cards.[14]
The skill of a magician lies in his or her ability to keep you frozen in expectation of their next unbelievable trick. It often seems that magicians really are capable of doing things which defy all known laws of the universe, and the atmosphere of awe they create during their performances helps further reduce any doubts you have that this is all a trick.

For starters, you will have to get some coffee cups for the trick. That’s all. This trick will need a lot of performance and creativity as well. Cut a really small hole in the Styrofoam on the side of the coffee cup. This hole should not be too small. It should be large enough to fit your right-hand thumb. Stick your thumb into the Styrofoam discretely. Next, gently lift both of your hands simultaneously before your audience while distracting them with magic sounds and finger waving in a levitating motion. Try to keep the cup in the middle of both of your hands for a better illusion. It will really look like the cup is floating.

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If I told you that it really is possible to do this trick, you would brush me aside and tell me that I am getting ahead of my limits. But this is a simple trick, and you will be kicking yourself once you find out how easy it is to get it done. You will need to get yourself to a good spot in the house or premises. A corner in the house is the best place to get this trick done. The most important part of this magic trick is to make sure that the audience is neither in front of you, nor behind you. The most preferable position for your audience to be in is just at the edge of the heel of your shoe. They must also be a couple of meters away from you in a diagonal position.  Another very important aspect is balance. You will need a lot of balance in this trick. In fact, you should probably start practicing on your balance first before attempting anything else.

The Effect: I cut a deck of cards a couple of times, and you glimpse flashes of several different cards. I turn the cards facedown and invite you to choose one, memorize it, and return it. Now I ask you to name your card. You say (for example), “The queen of hearts.” I take the deck in my mouth, bite down, and groan and wiggle to suggest that your card is going down my throat, through my intestines, into my bloodstream, and finally into my right foot. I lift that foot and invite you to pull off my shoe and look inside. You find the queen of hearts. You’re amazed. If you happen to pick up the deck later, you’ll find it’s missing the queen of hearts.
5. To fool the mind, combine at least two tricks. Every night in Las Vegas, I make a ball come to life like a trained dog. My method—the thing that fools your eye—is to puppeteer the ball with a thread too fine to be seen from the audience. But during the routine, the ball jumps through a wooden hoop several times, and that seems to rule out the possibility of a thread. The hoop is what magicians call misdirection, a second trick that “proves” the first. The hoop is genuine, but the deceptive choreography I use took 18 months to develop.
How does it work? There are several ways of doing the trick and one of the most popular is all about the magic equipment. The magician wears a special finger stall with a small, but very sharp blade. After showing the audience that the bottle is whole, he secretly cuts a line in it that's big enough to push a phone through. No magic here, really. Just a sleight of hand.
Magicians use sleight of hand in a wide variety of tricks, but one of the most popular genres of sleight of hand is in card magic. The following are basic sleight-of-hand techniques that card magicians perform with playing cards, both freestanding and at the card table. Such card manipulation takes years of practice to perfect, but these card flourishes will open up a world of possibilities.
The One-Hand Cut. Known as a “Charlier” cut, this is when a magician uses a single hand to separate the deck into two portions, flipping the upper half and lower half to switch their positions. It adds a cool flourish to easy card tricks, and it’s a necessary move to progress to a more advanced card trick. Plus, it leaves an empty hand free to perform misdirection or additional sleights.
Next, you will have to place the bottles into your freezer at a constant temperature of -24 degrees. You can set the temperature knob to 5 or 7. (Make sure you leave the bottles overnight outside the freezer before putting them in the Freezer. This is to make sure the bottles absorb the room temperature.) After inserting the bottles into the freezer, make sure they lie on their sides, and that the distances between them are equal. Close the freezer door and wait for one and a half hours. Open the door and check if the bottles are frozen. If they are not, quickly shut the door and keep checking after 15 minutes. It usually takes about between 2 hours and 30 minutes to 2 hours and forty five minutes for the first bottle to freeze. Don’t expect the bottle to completely freeze over. It will still be a liquid albeit with flakes of ice floating about. Gently take the bottles out slowly and make sure you have an audience present. Grab a bowl and fill it with some ice. Now open your bottle and pour out the water onto the ice. You will immediately notice that the water will freeze upon contact with the flakes creating unique cone flakes that you can give your friends. The best way to ensure success with this trick is to make sure you get the temperatures right. Over freezing or under freezing might result in the trick not working, so make sure you get the temperature just right.

In order to perform the illusion, Copperfield used an assistant for the latter part of his body. Together they seemed to be just a single person. The secret of this trick is in the table beneath and the tiny gap between the tables that the saw blade can easily pass through. Copperfield's legs were bent into the table, and the assistant’s upper body was hidden in the table below.


In 1983, David Copperfield made the Statue of Liberty disappear completely. The trick can be explained very simply. The Statue was draped with a huge piece of fabric or covered by a big screen put in front of the audience. The whole illumination of the monument was turned off except for the spotlights. This simple preparation created the illusion of hollow space, and the set of lights blinded the audience. After the monument was unveiled, people were not able to see it because their vision was temporarily blurred by the spotlights.
Quite simple, actually. The magician prepared a half back cover of an iPhone and quickly put it over the screen while performing the trick. When Dynamo shows his audience the iPhone, he shows it from the back. Then, covering the device with both hands, he rotates it entirely, showing the screen side with the half back cover over it. From the side it looks like the phone was twisted but we assure you that no iPhone was harmed that day.

The brain simplifies and streamlines. By relying on experience, logic, and generalization, people make assumptions about the things they see, so they don’t have to stop and examine every single object they encounter. Magicians exploit people’s instantaneous assumptions, particularly the ones people make about the side of objects that they cannot see.


The One-Hand Cut. Known as a “Charlier” cut, this is when a magician uses a single hand to separate the deck into two portions, flipping the upper half and lower half to switch their positions. It adds a cool flourish to easy card tricks, and it’s a necessary move to progress to a more advanced card trick. Plus, it leaves an empty hand free to perform misdirection or additional sleights.
In addition to manual dexterity, sleight of hand relies upon misdirection, psychological manipulation, timing, story, and natural choreography. An example from coin magic is the French drop, where the magician appears to transfer a coin from the right hand to the left hand but actually keeps the coin palmed in the original hand. By motivating the sleight, timing the drop to a moment when the left hand obscures the sleight, and selling misdirection by focusing on the left hand, the magician completely fools the audience.
The Effect: I cut a deck of cards a couple of times, and you glimpse flashes of several different cards. I turn the cards facedown and invite you to choose one, memorize it, and return it. Now I ask you to name your card. You say (for example), “The queen of hearts.” I take the deck in my mouth, bite down, and groan and wiggle to suggest that your card is going down my throat, through my intestines, into my bloodstream, and finally into my right foot. I lift that foot and invite you to pull off my shoe and look inside. You find the queen of hearts. You’re amazed. If you happen to pick up the deck later, you’ll find it’s missing the queen of hearts.

The brain simplifies and streamlines. By relying on experience, logic, and generalization, people make assumptions about the things they see, so they don’t have to stop and examine every single object they encounter. Magicians exploit people’s instantaneous assumptions, particularly the ones people make about the side of objects that they cannot see.
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